Staffordshire Bull Terrier Information

Overview

The Strattfordshire Bull Terrier is very strong for its size. Active and agile, its primary use is as a loyal family companion. For show, the Staffordshire Bull Terrier competes in obedience and agility rings. This breed draws its strength and tenacity from past history. In the 19th century, coal miners in Staffordshire, England wanted a dog that was fast and small. They developed the breed by combining the Bulldog breed with a small local Terrier. The result was a smallish yet fast, strong dog with high intelligence and unyielding courage.

Staffordshire Bull Terrier
Basic Info
NameStaffordshire Bull Terrier
Other NameStaffy, Staff, SBT, Stafford, Staffy Bull
OriginEngland
Size Type Medium Dog Breeds
Breed Group Terrier Dog Breeds
Life Span12 - 15 years
TemperamentBold, Courageous, Affectionate, Intelligent, Fearless, Reliable
Height14 to 16 inches
Weight24 to 38 lbs
ColorsBlue, Fawn, Red, Black, Brindle, Black & White
Puppy Price$1200 - $1800 USD

Staffordshire Bull Terrier

Physical description

Body Type

The Pekingese is stocky, muscular and surprisingly heavy for its size when lifted. Most weigh under 14 pounds. Kennel clubs disqualify them from showing if they weight more. The Pekingese head is large in proportion to its body. When measured from forechest to buttocks, it is a little longer than tall. Heart-shaped ears are set on the front of the skull and lie flat. The ears are heavily feathered and fringed. The nose is short and broad with well-opened nostrils. A wrinkle, or hairy fold of skin extends from one cheek over the bridge of the nose to the other side in a wide inverted V-shape. It separates the lower and upper areas of the face. The broad, flat muzzle is filled-in below the eyes. The lower jaw is broad and undershot. The neck of the Pekingese is thick and short. The body is somewhat pear-shaped and lies low to the ground. The broad forechest has no protruding breastbone.It has a heavy front and well-sprung ribs between the forelegs. The topline is straight, the chest is deep to a lighter loin and the waist is narrow. The slightly arched tail is high-set and free of curls or kinks. Long, straight fringing may fall to one side. Staffordshire Bull Terriers stand between 14 to 16 inches in height at the shoulder. Male dogs weigh from 28 to 38 pounds, and females weigh between 24 to 34 pounds. From withers to tail set, the length of the back is the same as from the withers to the ground. The head has a short, broad skull with a distinct stop. The foreface is short and cheek muscles are prominent. The medium-sized eyes are round and set to look straight ahead. The ears are smallish and half-pricked. Lips are tight, and the bite should show the outer lower incisors touching the inner side of side upper incisors. An extreme overshot or undershot bite is disqualified for show standards. The neck is fairly short and muscular with an outline that gradually widens toward the shoulders. The close-coupled body has a level topline, wide front and deep brisket. Well-sprung ribs are light in the loins. The tail is of medium length and is not docked, is set low and tapers to a point. The tail is not usually curly. Badly curled tails are disqualified for show. The legs are set rather far apart, straight and well-boned. Feet slightly turn out a little from the pasterns. The feet are medium-sized, strong and well-padded. The hindquarters are strong and well-muscled.

Color

The Staffordshire Bull Terrier's coat hair is very short and close to the skin. This gives the dog an overall smooth appearance. They should never be trimmed nor de-whiskered. Coat colors for the breed include black, blue, red, fawn and any one of these colors along with white. Color has no bearing on the price of the dog. The AKC recognizes any color with brindle and any brindle shade with white. Liver or black and tan are disqualified.

Coat

The Staffordshire Bull Terrier's coat hair is very short and close to the skin. This gives the dog an overall smooth appearance. They should never be trimmed nor de-whiskered. Coat colors for the breed include black, blue, red, fawn and any one of these colors along with white. Color has no bearing on the price of the dog. The AKC recognizes any color with brindle and any brindle shade with white. Liver or black and tan are disqualified.

Characteristics
Good with Kids
 
Cat Friendly
 
Dog Friendly
 
Trainability
 
Shedding
 
Watchdog
 
Intelligence
 
Grooming
 
Popularity
 
Adaptability
 
Hypoallergenic  No

Grooming

A single coated breed, it is known as the original "wash and wear" dog. They do shed all year, even in winter. Brush lightly once a week to remove loose hair. A weekly rub-down with a damp cloth is generally all that is needed. Bathe with a gentle shampoo if the dog gets very dirty. Rinse well. Check the ears periodically and clean with an ear wash if needed. Do not clean past the part of the inside of the ear you can see. Brush teeth about twice a week with a veterinarian-approved toothbrush and toothpaste. Professional cleanings will remove any tartar build-up.

History

The breed has roots from many centuries ago in England when the Mastiff and the Bulldog were closely related. During the Elizabethan Era, large dogs were produced for the sport of bull-baiting and bear-baiting. As time went by, the 100-120 pound dogs gave way to more agile and smaller breeds of up to 90 pounds. As the sport of dog fighting grew popular early in the 19th century, a smaller, faster dog was developed. These dogs were somewhat smaller than today's Bulldog, weighing around 60 pounds. They were known by such names as "Bull Terrier" or "Bulldog Terrier." Eventually, this dog was crossed with a small, native terrier which is now known as the Manchester Terrier. This cross-breeding produced a dog averaging between 30 and 45 pounds and was predictably called "Staffordshire Bull Terrier." Early in the 19th century, the sport of dog fighting gained popularity and a smaller, faster dog was developed. It was called by names such as "Bulldog Terrier" and "Bull Terrier." The Bulldog bred then was a larger dog than we know today and weighed about 60 pounds. This dog was crossed with a small, native terrier which appears in the history of the present-day Manchester Terrier. Averaging between 30 and 45 pounds, it was called Staffordshire Bull Terrier. In the later part of the century, about 1860, an all-white English Bull Terrier was produced by cross-breeding the Old Pit Bull Terrier (today's Staffordshire Bull Terrier). This Bull Terrier was recognized by the English Kennel Club in the last part of the century. Because the Staffordshire Bull Terrier had a reputation as a fighting dog, it did not receive the same glorification. Thankfully, by 1935 dog fighting had long-been made illegal and the the Staffordshire was recognized by the English Kennel Club. The breed then had an even temperate and made a fine pet and show dog. These Bull and Terrier breeds are thought to have arrived in North America during the mid-1800s. The Staffordshire Bull Terrier was recognized by the AKC Stud Book in 1974.

Temperament

This bred is obedient, courageous, intelligent and affectionate. They love children and enjoy socializing with their owner's human friends. It has a quietness and stability that makes it an all-purpose dog. Although the Staffordshire is fearless and loyal, strength and determination require an owner that will provide plenty of training in a firm, yet gentle way. He needs daily exercise and chew toys for his powerful jaws.


Interesting Staffordshire Bull Terrier Facts

  • Staffordshires are noted for being highly adaptable in terms of owners and homes, making them susceptible to dog-napping
  • Because Pit Bulls are banned in several countries, it is feared that some breeders are claiming the Pit Bull to be a Staffordshire Bull Terrier.
  • Liver-colored and black and tan Staffordshires are rare.
  • Staffordshires do not have a temperament well-suited for training as a guard dog.