Pekingese Information

Overview

The Pekingese is a small dog of Chinese origin. It gets its name from the ancient city of Peking, which is now modern Beijing. They were sacred in China, and only royals were allowed to own one. Punishment for stealing one was no less than death. Although small, the Pekingese is considered more lion-like than delicate or dainty. They display great courage, self-esteem and dignity. They are popular dogs for apartment dwellers since they are fairly inactive indoors and do not require yard space. They do, however enjoy a daily walk.

Pekingese
Basic Info
NamePekingese
Other Name pekingese-lion dog, Lion Dog, Chinese Spaniel, Pelchie Dog, Peking Palasthund, Peke
OriginChina
Size Type Small Dog Breeds
Breed Group Toy Dog Breeds
Life Span12 - 15 years
TemperamentStubborn, Intelligent, Affectionate, Opinionated, Aggressive, Good-natured
Height6–9 inches
Weight7–14 lb
ColorsBlack, Fawn, Grey, Black & Tan, Cream, Fawn Brindle
Puppy Price$400 - $600 USD

Pekingese

Physical description

Body Type

The Pekingese is stocky, muscular and surprisingly heavy for its size when lifted. Most weigh under 14 pounds. Kennel clubs disqualify them from showing if they weight more. The Pekingese head is large in proportion to its body. When measured from forechest to buttocks, it is a little longer than tall. Heart-shaped ears are set on the front of the skull and lie flat. The ears are heavily feathered and fringed. The nose is short and broad with well-opened nostrils. A wrinkle, or hairy fold of skin extends from one cheek over the bridge of the nose to the other side in a wide inverted V-shape. It separates the lower and upper areas of the face. The broad, flat muzzle is filled-in below the eyes. The lower jaw is broad and undershot. The neck of the Pekingese is thick and short. The body is somewhat pear-shaped and lies low to the ground. The broad forechest has no protruding breastbone.It has a heavy front and well-sprung ribs between the forelegs. The topline is straight, the chest is deep to a lighter loin and the waist is narrow. The slightly arched tail is high-set and free of curls or kinks. Long, straight fringing may fall to one side. The forequarters are short and thick with forelegs slightly bowed. Distance from the shoulder's point to the tip of the withers is about the same as from the shoulder's point to the elbow. The front feet turn out slightly when standing and walking. The forequarters are heavier than the hindquarters. The hind legs are fairly close and parallel when viewed from behind.

Color

The Pekingese is known for its long, coarse and straight outer coat and soft, thick undercoat. The coat forms a mane at the shoulder and neck area with somewhat longer hair than on the rest of the coat. Long feathering is on the backs of the thighs, forelegs and toes. Even longer fringing is found of on the tail and ears. Their are many coat colors for the Pekingese, and all are acceptable by the AKC. The skin is black on all coat colors. A black mask may be on the face and is also acceptable. Exposed skin (muzzle, lips, nose and eye rims) is always black on all coat colors.

Coat

The Pekingese is known for its long, coarse and straight outer coat and soft, thick undercoat. The coat forms a mane at the shoulder and neck area with somewhat longer hair than on the rest of the coat. Long feathering is on the backs of the thighs, forelegs and toes. Even longer fringing is found of on the tail and ears. Their are many coat colors for the Pekingese, and all are acceptable by the AKC. The skin is black on all coat colors. A black mask may be on the face and is also acceptable. Exposed skin (muzzle, lips, nose and eye rims) is always black on all coat colors.

Characteristics
Good with Kids
 
Cat Friendly
 
Dog Friendly
 
Trainability
 
Shedding
 
Watchdog
 
Intelligence
 
Grooming
 
Popularity
 
Adaptability
 
Hypoallergenic  No

Grooming

The Pekingese requires more extensive grooming than short-haired breeds. Brush regularly and thoroughly to prevent matting. Lay him down on one side and begin brushing at the chest. Using a spray conditioner and a natural-bristle brush, work towards the head. Make certain to get the brush bristle down to the thick undercoat. Next, work in sections to brush out entirely and then repeat on the other side. Then standing him up, brush the hair forward. Brush hair under the ears toward the face and brush the rest of the head flat. Part tail hair in the middle and brush smooth. Brush hair on the legs upward for fullness. Bathe a Pekingese only when dirty to avoid stripping the coat of healthy oils. Bathing too frequently will cause dry, irritated skin. Corn starch or talc can be used as a dry shampoo between baths. Wipe the face daily with a soft, damp cloth. Check and clean ears at least once a week. When mats are found, use a spray conditioner and a mat ripper to remove them. When it is time to trim the nails, have a professional groomer do it first and show how it should be done to avoid pain and bleeding. Teeth should be brushed with canine toothpaste a few times a week.

History

Known by folklore as the Lion Dog of China, the earliest known record of the existence of the real Pekingese can be traced to the Tang Dynasty of the 8th century. Breeding reached a peak during the Tao Kuang period of 1821-1851. The oldest strains were kept very pure. Breeding was well planned and elaborate even though pedigree records were not kept. Pictures in Imperial Dog Books were used for the standards. Breeders used what is now known as prenatal impression, placing the mother dogs near pictures of desired looks and placing them in sleeping quarters of the desired color. The introduction of the Pekingese was mostly because of the Dowager Empress giving them as gifts to influential Americans. The breed was first registered by the AKC in 1906.

Temperament

The Pekingese is very brave, somewhat independent but extremely affectionate with its owner. They make wonderful companions. The owner should make sure the dog sees him or her as the leader of the pack to avoid behavior problems. Otherwise, negative behaviors such as snapping, biting, jealousy and separation anxiety may occur. These behaviors can happen when the Pekingese is allowed to take over the house. Firm rules and daily walks will make a well-rounded pet that is not wary of strangers and untrustworthy with children.


Interesting Pekingese Facts

 

  • In ancient Peking, people without nobility were required to bow to the Pekingese.

 

 

  • In 1860, guards were ordered to kill the Pekingese to keep them from falling into British hands. Five were spared and given to Queen Victoria.

 

  • One Chinese legend says that the Pekingese is the result of a lion and a monkey mating.