Newfoundland Information

Overview

A large dog breed, the Newfoundland is a true workhorse. They are master long-distance swimmers and have a true instinct to save the drowning. They have heavy coats to protect them from the icy waters of northern climates. They are as content in the water as they are on land. They are great competitors in obedience, conformation, tracking. agility, draft and water tests and carting. Although there are conflicting stories on the origin of the breed, all agree that the dog was brought to Newfoundland by European fishermen. They were used in Newfoundland to pull fishermen's nets and to haul wood from the forest. They even powered the blacksmith's bellows.

Newfoundland
Basic Info
NameNewfoundland
Other NameNewf, Newfie, The Gentle Giant
OriginCanada & England
Size Type Giant Dog Breeds
Breed Group Working Dog Breeds
Life Span8 - 10 years
TemperamentGentle, Trainable, Sweet-Tempered
Height26 to 28 inches
Weight100 to 150 lbs
ColorsBlack, Black & White, Grey, Brown
Puppy PriceAverage $1000 - $2000 USD

Newfoundland

Physical description

Body Type

The average adult dog is around 27 inches in height and weight ranges between 130 pounds for males. Females are smaller at about 26 inches in height, with weight ranging from 100 to 120 pounds. In kennel club standards, large size should not compromise balance and correct gait. The breed is slightly longer than tall. The Newfoundland is of much substance as determined by strong muscle and heavy bone. The Newfoundland has a massive head with a broad skull and slightly arched crown. Eyes are usually dark brown and expressive, relatively small, spaced wide and deep-set. The ears are also small in relation to the large body, and are triangular with rounded tips. The muzzle is rounded at the top, and the bridge is either straight or very slightly rounded. The strong teeth meet in a scissors bite. The neck is strong and well-set on the shoulders to proudly carry the massive head. The chest is full and deep with ribs well-sprung. The croup is broad and slightly sloped, and the flank is deep. The tail is strong with a broad base. The shoulders and forelegs are muscular. Forelegs are straight and heavily boned. Webbed feet are proportionate in size to the large body. Hindquarters are also muscular and heavily boned with broad, fairly long thighs.

Color

Brown, black, gray and black with white are the recognized Newfoundland colors. Solid colors and white with black may have white on the chest, chin, toes and on the tip of the tail. A tinge of bronze may appear on a gray or black coat and lighter furnishings may appear on a brown or gray coat. Facial and muzzle hair is short and fine. The back legs are feathered for the entire length. The hair on the tail is long and dense.

Coat

Brown, black, gray and black with white are the recognized Newfoundland colors. Solid colors and white with black may have white on the chest, chin, toes and on the tip of the tail. A tinge of bronze may appear on a gray or black coat and lighter furnishings may appear on a brown or gray coat. Facial and muzzle hair is short and fine. The back legs are feathered for the entire length. The hair on the tail is long and dense.

Characteristics
Good with Kids
 
Cat Friendly
 
Dog Friendly
 
Trainability
 
Shedding
 
Watchdog
 
Intelligence
 
Grooming
 
Popularity
 
Adaptability
 
Hypoallergenic  No

Grooming

Because the Newfoundland is a large dog with lots of hair, grooming is more challenging than with some other breeds. Some people prefer to have them professionally groomed, but it can be done by the average dog owner with some effort. They have thick coats that require frequent grooming, and doing it at home can save money. Brushing and combing at least once weekly will help to control shedding and keep the coat and skin healthy. Using a firm bristle brush or wire-pin brush, brush with long, gentle strokes. Working in the direction of hair growth, start at the head and work down to the shoulders, back and sides, legs and tail. Work through the outer coat, then lift the outer coat with your hand. Use short, gentle strokes on the undercoat and brush opposite in direction of hair growth. Ask the veterinarian to show the proper way to trim fur around the ears, feet and legs. Fur on the chest can be thinned with a grooming rake. Use firm strokes and pause often to clean hair from the rake.

History

Some believe the Newfoundland breed to be a descendant of the Nomadic Indian dogs or Viking "bear dog." Others consider it to be a relative of the Labrador since there are similarities in the two breeds and the coast of Newfoundland is close in proximity to Labrador. Still others believe that the breed originated from a cross between Tibetan Mastiffs brought to Canada by European fishermen and local dogs. In any case, the Newfoundland became excellent water rescuers, and many owe their lives to these dogs. These heroes also hauled supplies and ammunition during WWII during blizzard conditions for armed forces in Alaska and the Aleutian Islands.

Temperament

The Newfoundland is known for its sweet disposition, making it a good family pet. Although they appear to be very docile, they are active and need daily exercise. They are intelligent and easily trained. Quite courageous, they are obedient and calm around guests or strangers. They do not bark a lot but are protective when needed. Newfoundlands are generally good with other animals and very gentle with children. It has been noted that when the Newfoundland is faced with an intruder, they corner them rather than attacking them. The dog will place itself between the intruder and the family. They can sense an intruder from a visitor quite well.


Interesting Newfoundland Facts

  • Newfoundlands prefer to live in colder climates.
  • In warmer climates, they need plenty of shade and cool water.
  • In 1919, a Newfoundland was awarded a Gold Medal for pulling in a lifeboat full of 20 people.