American Staffordshire Terrier Information

Overview

The Staffordshire Terrier is strong, courageous and intelligent. A stocky body and strong head is its most prominent features. Agile and obedient, this dog breed is well-suited for tracking and conformation. It is a hard working dog and thrives on given a job to do. It also loves being part of a family. It is friendly but loyal and will do its best to protect its family when necessary. Its short-haired coat makes it a low maintenance dog for grooming.

American Staffordshire Terrier
Basic Info
NameAmerican Staffordshire Terrier
Other NameAmStaff
OriginUnited States
Size Type Medium Dog Breeds
Breed Group Terrier Dog Breeds
Life Span10 -12 years
TemperamentDevoted, Courageous, Loyal, Tenacious, Attentive, Friendly
HeightFemale: 17–18 inches; Male: 18–19 inches
Weight50 to 60 lbs
ColorsFawn, Brindle, Black, Blue, Brown, Sable
Puppy Price$800 - $900 USD

American Staffordshire Terrier

Physical description

Body Type

The general impression for the Staffordshire Terrier is one of great strength for its size. Males stand 17 to 18 inches high and females stand about an inch less. This breed is stocky rather than agile and long legged. The medium length head has a broad skull with a distinct stop. Cheek muscles are very prominent and cropped or un-cropped ears are set high. Dark, round eyes are set far apart and low in the skull. Pink eyelids are disqualified by kennel clubs. A medium length muzzle is rounded at the top and falls away just below the eyes. The jaws are strong and well-defined. The neck and shoulders are strong and muscular. The neck is slightly arched and shoulder blades are wide and sloping. The back is short with a slight slope from withers to rump and again from the rump to the base of the tail. The ribs are well-sprung, close together and set deep in the rear. The forelegs are set wide apart for deep and broad chest development. A low-set tail is short in comparison to body size. The front legs are straight and round-boned. Well-muscled hindquarters let down at the hocks and turn neither in nor out.

Color

Coat colors for the Staffordshire Terrier are red, white, black, blue and fawn. These colors may be in patches with white or any shade of brindle either with or without while. Kennel clubs recognize solid, patched and parti-colored. Black, tan and liver colors are not preferred.The American Kennel Club standards encourage a coat of less than 80 percent white. The coat is smooth, short and low-maintenance. The thick hair is stiff with a glossy appearance.

Coat

Coat colors for the Staffordshire Terrier are red, white, black, blue and fawn. These colors may be in patches with white or any shade of brindle either with or without while. Kennel clubs recognize solid, patched and parti-colored. Black, tan and liver colors are not preferred.The American Kennel Club standards encourage a coat of less than 80 percent white. The coat is smooth, short and low-maintenance. The thick hair is stiff with a glossy appearance.

Characteristics
Good with Kids
 
Cat Friendly
 
Dog Friendly
 
Trainability
 
Shedding
 
Watchdog
 
Intelligence
 
Grooming
 
Popularity
 
Adaptability
 
Hypoallergenic  No

Grooming

The Staffordshire Terrier needs regular brushing and an occasional bath. Avoid waiting until the dog is extremely dirty and matted to introduce it to brushing. This could cause the dog to associate brushing with unpleasantness. Using a slicker brush, brush against the growth of the hair and then use a wide-toothed comb. Brushing removes loose hair and the combing removes tangles. Next, brush along hair growth making sure to reach the skin. Keep excess hair on the paws clipped with electric clippers. Avoid clipping hair between the pads. Check pads for cuts and foreign objects often. The teeth can be brushed two or three times a week with a veterinarian-approved toothpaste. Take dogs with built up tarter in for a professional cleaning.

History

The breed was established in the English region of Staffordshire by crossing the Bulldog with various terriers. The result was an active, muscular and combative dog that became the Staffordshire Bullterrier. After the breed was brought to the United States, American breeders increased its weight and developed a more powerful head. The Americanized Staffordshire Terrier became heavier and larger than than the Staffordshire Bull Terrier. Upon the banning of dog fighting in the United States in 1900, two strains were developed- a show strain and a non-show strain. The show strain became known as the American Staffordshire and the non-show dog was called American Pit Bull Terrier. Recognized as two separate breeds, the American Pit Bull Terrier is now being bred with the gentleness of the American Staffordshire Terrier. With the right owner, both make good family pets. The American Kennel Club first recognized the American Staffordshire Terrier in 1936. They are also used as guard dogs, for weight pulling and in police work.

Temperament

The Staffordshire Terrier is intelligent, outgoing and confident. It is gentle with people and makes a loyal and affectionate family pet for adults and children. It is almost always obedient and wants very much to please its master. Fifty years of careful breeding has produced a loving and trustworthy pet. Highly protective, it is a persistent fighter when provoked. If this dog is cornered and trapped by an enemy, it will fight to the death to protect its family. They have a high tolerance for pain. This breed needs to be socialized well as a puppy to keep away any dog aggressive tendencies.


Interesting American Staffordshire Terrier Facts

  • Staffordshire Terriers have been subject to breed banning because of bad publicity involving Pit Bulls and other similar breeds.
  • Petey in Our Gang film's "The Little Rascals" was a Staffordshire Terrier.
  • Sergeant Stubby was a Staffordshire Terrier that served in 17 battles during World War I.